Great New Infographic on Apps for students with and without Disabilities

Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) 2014 Conference in Philadelphia will have a RTI/MTSS & ELL Workshop

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CEC will be supporting a number of pre-conference workshops at the 2014 conference Philadelphia so mark your calendars for April 9. Julie and I have been invited to present on the following multi-tiered instruction, supports, and assessment for English Language Learners (ELLs). For more information and registration please visit their website at www.cec.sped.org WORKSHOP 6: Multi-Tiered Instruction, Support, and Assessment for English Learners: Making Appropriate Decisions Leaders: Julie Esparza Brown,.

National Title III State Directors Meeting

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Claudia and Julie just presented on Response to Intervention for English Leaners at the National Title III today State Directors Conference.

Apps for Diverse English Language Leaners by Dr. Collier 2013

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Thanks to Dr. Catherine Collier — I can share a list and catalog she composed that has more than 50+ apps that support English Language Leaners. My favorite is Language Builder which allows students to record themselves in any language. The students can then hear themselves or their teachers while learning new vocabulary words, phrases and sentences. Feel Free to check it http://www.crosscultured.com/documents/Website/Apps.pdf

What are we missing when we look at data to improve instruction?

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Great visual report from the Data Quality Control Campaign on “Data: the Missing Piece to Improve Student Achievement“– this report provides guidance on how to use data for student improvement. The visual present how things were done in the past and what the future should look like guided by the questions: What is data? How will it help? What do we do now? The visual chart address how this process.

Annenberg Institute’s Vue Journal- Issue on ELLs and Innovative Educational Programing

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This great resource just came out this month (September 2013). The journal entitled “English Language Learners: Shifting to an Asset-Based Paradigm / Estudiantes del Idioma Inglés: Valorizando los Aportes Que Brindan” focuses on seeing the education of English language learners not as a problem, but an opportunity for innovation and valuing of biculturalism and bilingualism. Three articles in particularly are worth reading: 1. Innovations in Educational Equity for English Language.

New Article from Penn State on the Benefits of Bilingualism

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Think twice, speak once: Bilinguals process both languages by Victoria M. Indivero is one of the articles on the benefits of bilingualism. The study conducted by Judith F. Kroll, a distinguished professor, provides some new interesting new views: 1. Bilingual speakers can switch languages seamlessly showing a sign of higher level of mental flexibility than monolinguals 2. Switching languages all the time strengthens your mental muscle and the executive function.

Response to Intervention (RTI) and the role in the Referral of Learning Disabilities

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As par tof my current role in the Urban Special Education Collaborative we have just published a new research brief entitled “The Nexus of Response to Intervention (RtI) and the Identification of Specific Learning Disabilities (SLD): Guidelines for District-Level Implementation.” This brief summarizes current research in the field and describes guidance that states have been developing for districts, schools, and educators on the special education referral and eligibility practices for.

Essential Concepts in Reading for Bilingual Students by Maria De Lourdes Serpa

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This is a definition of reading I can live with as a bilingual myself and as a teacher and teacher trainer of reading. Dr. Serpa in 1982 developed the following definition of reading. Reading is a language-based process that uses written symbols as a means of communication (Serpa, 1982). The SIX elements of Reading for bilingual English Language Learners (ELLs) from the National Reading Panel and the National Literacy Panel.

Despite of language, what type of ability grouping should teachers use?

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Sharon Vaughn answers that in the International Reading Association blog site -the following question from a teacher. What Type of Literature Circle Grouping Works Best—Same Ability or Mixed Ability? Click here to read what latest research says about ability, mixed, pairing, small group and 1 to 1 instructional grouping. Basic summary use it all!– find your purpose, identify the standards you are addressing, look at your data and provide a.